Prayer before birth

The element water - the child wants to be able to play in it, the child wants talking trees, all the beautiful things that make a paradise, a healthy, ideal environment in which to live.

The tactic of speaking through a baby allows the readers to see the juxtaposition of evil and innocence. Is it a fear of being brainwashed, fear of being abused spiritually. Stanza 7 The longest stanza in the poem. The opening lines are an introduction to the poem and in parallel an introduction to the reader of the tone of the poem and However, his knowledge of all things evil allows the reader to understand the true gravity of the evils of the world.

Ultimately, this child does not want to have a heart of stone, just functioning, and not really living a full creative and wonderful life in harmony with, and at peace with, others in a just society. It makes one feel sympathy toward this new baby, and all that he would experience during life.

This reveals that the author has knowledge of poverty as one of the many worldly evils for which he asks for protection against. In the poem, Louis MacNeice expresses his fear at what the world's tyranny can do to the innocence of a child and blames the human race "for the sins that in me the world shall commit".

Let not the bloodsucking bat or the rat or the stoat or the club-footed ghoul come near me. These two different types of human beings represent two totally opposite ends of the spectrum of humanity. Yet, the poem is firmly rooted in grim reality. This is evident in the callous, unsparing line: MacNeice also talks of being a "cog in a machine" - this shows that he feels that society will mould the child to become part of everything else around him, he will be worthless, insignificant and merely a part of an entire collaboration.

The poem also contains many religious themes and overtones through the use of double-imagery; the child could be seen as a metaphor for Christmaking reference to certain themes and events said to have occurred during his ministry on earth. The speaker makes it quite clear that freedom is paramount if he is to be born.

Thus, he asks for forgiveness. Right from the beginning of the poem the mood is one of gruesomeness. Is it a fear of being brainwashed, fear of being abused spiritually. Again, echoes of Shakespeare's hamlet speech He asks to be guarded from addiction and from war.

Stanza 8 In this final stanza, the speaker asks for protection against being killed. Forgiveness is wanted for all words and thoughts and deeds, which the unborn child may unwittingly, without conscious control, manifest in the world.

The opening lines are an introduction to the poem and in parallel an introduction to the reader of the tone of the poem and of the world the child will enter into. Finally, at the end of Prayer Before Birth, he asks God for his very life.

And there is the repetition, anaphora, the plea from the unborn to be heard, to be filled, to be free. Note also that the first two stanzas and the last contain two sentences. The first lines of the sixth stanza may refer to men like Hitler and Xerxes who think themselves to be God and he asks Him to keep him away from such men.

There are historical references too. This unborn child fears a life of being doped up by drugs. He wants freedom from this kind of lifestyle. Context. Louis MacNeice ( – ) was born in Belfast.

He was educated in England and read classics at Oxford University where he met his wife, Giovanna. Context. Louis MacNeice ( – ) was born in Belfast. He was educated in England and read classics at Oxford University where he met his wife, Giovanna.

“ Prayer Before Birth” by Louis McNiece is a dramatic monologue written from the perspective of an unborn child.

Please give a summary of the poem

Through the persona of an unborn child, the monologue makes an anxious plea for individuality, a worthwhile and natural life free from any manipulatory and.

There is no regular rhyme scheme but the word ‘me’ is repeated at the end of several lines throughout the poem to suggest a repetitive, rhythmic prayer. Prayer Before Birth 1.

Prayer Before Birth - Poem by Louis Macneice

Prayer Before Birth Louis MacNeice 2. Louis MacNeice • Louis MacNeice born September 12,in Belfast, Ireland.

Prayer Before Birth

• Attended Oxford University: classics and philosophy. • accepted post as classics lecturer, University of Birmingham. • joined BBC as a staff writer and producer.

Throughout Prayer Before Birth, the speaker has asked for protection against every kind of evil. He longed to be kept pure from the evil so prevalent in the world. He longed to be kept pure from the evil so prevalent in the world.

Prayer Before Birth by Louis MacNeice Prayer before birth
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Please give a summary of the poem "Prayer before birth" by Louis MacNeice. | eNotes